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Day Tour to Luxor from Hurghada

Location Hurghada, Red Sea, Egypt
$327.18
This is an experience gift voucher. The recipient will book the experience after they redeem the gift voucher.
Overview
Discover Luxor Tour From Hurghada to see Egypt’s ‘open-air museum’. See Luxor Temple and Karnak Temple on the east bank of the Nile, as well as Hatshepsut Temple and the Valley of the Kings on the west bank
Day Tour to Luxor from Hurghada
Pickup included
Tour guide
Language: English
Human tour guide
Duration: 12 hours
Availability depends on seasonality and number of participants. Bookings can not be made for the same day. Please read our TnC’s.

When giving as a gift, your recipient can choose a date at their convenience during a booking process. Otherwise, you can choose one after checkout and voucher redemption.
  • Tour to Karnak, Valley of the Kings and Hatshepsut Temple.
  • Lunch
  • Shopping through famous Bazaars.
  • Bottled water
  • All transfers by air-conditioned Vehicle / Assistance of our personnel during tours.
  • Service of professional tour guide /All Fees and Taxes
  • Optional Activities
  • Personal spending / Tipping
  • Temple of Karnak
    When visiting Karnak, you are paying a visit to the heart of Egypt during the New Kingdom. This huge temple complex was the center of the ancient faith while power was concentrated at Thebes (modern day Luxor) and its significance is reflected in its enormous size. In addition to its religious significance, it also served as a treasury, administrative center, and palace for the New Kingdom pharaohs. It is considered as the largest temple complex ever constructed anywhere in the world. It developed over a period of 1500 years, added to by generation after generation of pharaohs and resulting in a collection of temples, sanctuaries, pylons, and other decorations that is unparalleled throughout Egypt. While the height of its importance was during the New Kingdom and famous pharaohs such as Hatshepsut, Tuthmose III, Seti I and Ramesses II all contributed significant additions to the complex, construction continued into the Greco-Roman Period with the Ptolomies, Romans, and early Christians all leaving their mark here.
  • Valley of the Kings
    At first glance, the Valley of the Kings, also known as the Valley of the Gates of the Kings, seems like no more than a sun-blasted gorge of generic red rock, but underneath all of its dust lay the tombs of 63 of the most important pharaohs in the history of Ancient Egypt. Used as a burial chamber for nearly 500 years from the 16th to 11th century BC, the Valley of the Kings was used for royal burials for the Kings, their families, and their possessions. In 1979, it became a World Heritage Site, as well as the rest of the Theban Necropolis. Discovered by Howards Carter in an excavation expedition in 1922, one of the most important tombs found in the Valley of the Kings is the tomb of Pharaoh Tutankhamun and all of his treasures. This discovery has ever since then attracted tourists from all over the world as the treasures found traveled the world on a tour to spread the news that this very important discovery for the history of our civilization was discovered in the Valley of the kings. To this day excavations are still in process in some areas of the Valley of the Kings and a rotation system is in place for visitors to visit the tombs as restoration procedures are in place to recover the tombs that were found. The Valley of the Kings is located on the west bank of the Nile River near Luxor. It is the most famous site for having unique collections of tombs and breathtaking ancient ruins. That location makes it one of the hottest spots for exploring ancient Egyptian history. The richness of the findings here in the Valley of the Kings has kept archeologists busy for nearly two centuries. If all of the tombs here where open to visitors it would be nearly impossible to actually make it to all of them, but thankfully the possibility of such a huge task is eliminated for you. Building tombs were part of the ancient Egyptian’s belief of the afterlife and their preparations for the next world. The ancient Egyptians strongly believed in the afterlife where they were promised to continue their lives and pharaohs were promised to ally with the gods. That’s why the process of Mummification was important to preserve the body of the deceased to allow his eternal soul to wake up and live again in the afterlife. The ancient tombs also included all the belongings of the deceased as it was believed that they might need them once they woke up to live the eternal life. Salima Ikram, a professor of Egyptology at American University in Cairo and a National Geographic grantee said that the ancient Egyptian pharaohs included many things in their tombs including pieces of furniture, clothes, and jewelry. However, what remains a mystery is that they didn’t have any books buried with them. The most interesting fact was that the tombs included many kinds of foods and drinks such as wine and beer, as well as the precious objects that meant to help the deceased pass on to the afterlife. The pharaoh’s favored companions and servants were also buried with them. The tourism authorities only open a few of the tombs at a time in order to allow for a continual cycle of upkeep and restoration. Regardless, there are certain to be several impressive tombs open at any time. Be careful to heed the advice of your guide or guidebook on which ones to enter. The most famous tombs are not necessarily the most impressive and a ticket to the Valley of the Kings only allows you to enter three tombs. A separate ticket is required to enter Tutankhamun’s tomb although you may find it a disappointing sight, especially given the extra cost. During the New Kingdom’s period of ancient Egyptian (1539-1075 B.C.), the Valley of the Kings was the major burial ground for most of the royal pharaohs. The most famous pharaohs buried there were Tutankhamun, Seti I, and Ramses II. Also, you will find there the royal tombs of most of the 18th, 19th, and 20th dynasties queens, high priests, and other elites of that era. Remember that Tutankhamun was a relatively minor pharaoh, made famous by the fact that his tomb is the only one in the valley that was discovered with its contents still inside, not by the grandeur of his tomb relative to the others. Those contents are now on display in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.
  • Colossi of Memnon
    One of the biggest tourist attractions in Luxor, the Colossi of Memnon gained its popularity due to its majestic appearance and for the mysterious sounds emitted by the northern colossus statue at every sunrise. In the West Bank of Luxor Egypt, two magnificent twin statues image of pharaoh Amenhotep III and two smaller statues carved by his feet (one being his wife and the other his mother), stands graciously in the horizon of the magnificent Luxor horizons. The two statues, each measuring 60 feet tall, stands in the entrance of Amenhotep III’s mortuary temple. They are famously named by the name of Colossi of Memnon due to a phenomenon produced by one of the statues after an earthquake. Originally built in the Theban Necropolis in the west of the Nile River in the modern city of Luxor, the Colossi of Memnon, two colossal statues made of quartzite sandstone, which archaeologists believe was quarried at El-Gabal el-Ahmar, located near modern Cairo and then transported 420 miles overland to the ancient city of Thebes, remain after thousands of years. Pharaoh Amenhotep III reigned in Egypt during the 18th Dynasty from 1386 to 1349. During his kingdom, Egypt experienced a time of great prosperity and artistic progress, this era was known as the Old Kingdom. During the Old Kingdom, the architectural work improved tremendously in Egypt, and most of these monuments are still standing today. Many of these majestic monuments were built during Amenhotep III’s 39 years of reign including the Colossi of Memnon which construction was completed by 1350 BC. The Colossi of Memnon was constructed in front of which once was Amenhotep III’ temple (destroyed by an earthquake soon after its completion). Amenhotep Temple served as a funerary temple to the Pharaoh Amenhotep III. Due to an earthquake at 27 BC the Colossi of Memnon was partially destroyed and then restored by Roman emperors during the Roman Empire in ancient Egypt. Its modern Arabic name is Kom el-Hatan but the Colossi of Memnon is better known for its Roman name, the Temple of Memnon. A hero of the Trojan War, Memnon was a king of Ethiopia who traveled with his army from Africa to Asia Minor to help defend the beleaguered city under attack but it was slain by the Achilles. Memnon’s name whose means the steadfast or resolute, was the son of Eos, known for being the goddess of dawn. Memnon was associated with the Colossi many years after its construction due to the cry at dawn of the northern statue also known as the “Vocal Memnon.” Memnon’s eventually became known as the “Ruler of the West.” t was acting as guardians to the Temple of Amenhotep III. The Colossi of Memnon was meant to protect the Pharaoh’s temple from evil. Even though after the temple was destroyed by a severe earthquake, the Colossi of Memnon remains standing strongly for thousands of years. Due to an earthquake at 27 BC, the northern Colossus was partially destroyed, collapsing from the waist up and cracking the lower half. Following this event, the remainings of the northern colossus started to “sing” an hour or two before sunrise, right at dawn. The sound was mostly heard in the months of February or March but this might have been because those were the months were people were mostly reported to visit the statues. The sound was described as a “blow” according to the Greek historian and geographer Strabo, who heard the sound on his visit to the Colossi of Memnon in 20 BC. The legend about the “Vocal Memnon” says that it brought good luck to those who listened to its strange sounds. This rumor became known outside of Egypt, which brought many foreign visitors, including several Roman Emperors in search of the blessing that the “Vocal Memnon” could bring. Since its popularity, many through history and to modern days have tried to demystify the “Vocal Memnon” but no explanation has yet been proved to this day and they remain yet as another mystery of the ancient Egyptians civilization.
  • Temple of Hatshepsut at Deir el Bahari
    In terms of visual impact from afar, there is no rival to Hatshepsut’s Temples. The unique multi-tiered structure nestled up against the limestone cliffs at the shoulder of the river valley is a truly stunning sight. The uniqueness of its layout mirrors that of the pharaoh responsible for building it. Hatshepsut was the only female pharaoh in the history of Ancient Egypt. She came to power during the New Kingdom after the death of her father, Tuthmose I, and her half-brother and husband, Tuthmose II, who succeeded her father on the throne. She originally served as queen-regent to her husband's son by another wife, Tuthmose III, but seized the throne from him and managing to hold onto power until her death. However, Hatshepsut’s status as the only female to rule Egypt is not the only reason for her fame. She was also a very successful pharaoh. She ruled over an era of peace and prosperity, expanding lucrative trade routes to the land of Punt in the south. This accomplishment is immortalized in the relief carvings at her temple. She also contributed significantly to many temples, including Karnak. The temple was in ruins when it was discovered in the mid-19th century, having been heavily vandalized by Tuthmose III after he assumed the throne, presumably because Hatshepsut had kept him from power. The site was also used as a monastery during the early centuries AD, which probably contributed to its deterioration. As a result, it has been heavily restored. Most of the columns are not original and much of the relief paintings have not been well preserved. For this reason, the temple can be a bit disappointing close-up, especially given its popularity with tour groups. This accomplishment is immortalized in the relief carvings at her temple. She also contributed significantly to many temples, including Karnak It developed over a period of 1500 years, added to by generation after generation of pharaohs and resulting in a collection of temples, sanctuaries, pylons, and other decorations that is unparalleled throughout Egypt. While the height of its importance was during the New Kingdom and famous pharaohs such as Hatshepsut, Tuthmose III, Seti I and Ramesses II all contributed significant additions to the complex, construction continued into the Greco-Roman Period with the Ptolomies, Romans, and early Christians all leaving their mark here.
  • Specialized infant seats are available
  • Suitable for all physical fitness levels
  • For a full refund, cancel at least 24 hours before the scheduled departure time.
  • This experience requires good weather.
    If it’s canceled due to poor weather, you’ll be offered a different date or a full refund.
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    Day Tour to Luxor from Hurghada

    Location Hurghada, Red Sea, Egypt
    $327.18
    This is an experience gift voucher. The recipient will book the experience after they redeem the gift voucher.
    How it works?
    01 You choose from 10 000+ experience gifts
    02 We deliver the eVoucher or the Physical box to the recipient
    03 Recipient books the experience and creates unforgettable memories!

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    Physical Gift Box

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